Multimedia

Event Recordings

31 March 2021

Joel Bakan (University of British Columbia), Rose Batt (Cornell University), Isabelle Ferreras (UCLouvain), Isabelle Martin (Université de Montréal), John Peters (Laurentian University), Jim Stanford (Centre for Future Work), Gregor Murray (Université de Montréal)

The New Corporation. Le webinaire

With CEO compensation soaring, income inequality at all-time highs, the planet facing ecological disaster, and democracy in a precarious situation, Joel Bakan and Jennifer Abbott have again teamed up to make the movie The New Corporation: The Unfortunately Necessary Sequel. And, in printed form, from the author of The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (2004) comes The New Corporation: How “Good” Corporations are Bad for Democracy (2020).

This cry for social justice, deeper democracy and transformative solutions merits close attention from researchers and actors in the world of work. This is why we convened a conversation in the form of a webinar on The New Corporation, which took place on Wednesday, March 31st. It was an opportunity to bring together the book author and movie co-creator, Joel Bakan, with a stellar cast of specialists in a dialogue about corporations, work and democracy.

This Conversation on The New Corporation was an initiative of the CRIMT Partnership on Institutional Experimentation for Better Work, in collaboration with the Canadian Association for Work & Labour studies (CAWLS) and the Canadian Industrial Relations Association (CIRA).


24 March 2021

Karel Musilek (Cardiff Business School)

Working Lives Beyond Balance and Encroachment: Form of work/life in coliving

Sociological discussion of working and economic lives has tended to focus on questions of work/life balance and encroachment of work into non-work life. While this research provides useful insights, it has insufficiently reflected the transformation to practices and socio-material arrangements of working lives. Yet, it is within these practices and arrangements where the important extensive demands and intensification of work are accommodated and reproduced.

To start rectifying this lacuna, the author draws on and extend the notion of ‘forms of life’ as a lens through which to conceptualize working lives, how they are shaped and what social practices and arrangements sustain them. He explores this issue through a unique ethnographic study of coliving – a new way of living and novel site of sociological investigation – which seeks to modify domestic and personal lives in lines with demands of extensive and intensive work and ideals of professional and entrepreneurial success.


11 December 2020

Conference – discussion on telework [Held in French]

Conference on telework: state of play and reflection on the future of work

The Industry 4.0, Work and Employment Axis of the International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technology (OBVIA), in partnership with the the Inter-University Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT), the BMO-Diversity and Governance Research Chair and the Observatory on Health and Well-being at Work organized a conference-discussion on telework with researchers and labour market partners to take stock of the current situation and initiate reflection on the future of work.

Whether seen as a new way of organising flexible work, as a measure to increase productivity or as a means of preventing contagion, telework has suddenly become an unavoidable issue for workplaces. Between risks and opportunities, the current context of the pandemic offers a unique opportunity to examine the phenomenon in order to better understand the issues that surrounds it and to initiate a discussion on the kind of regulatory framework necessary in the post-Covid-19 era.

PRESENTATIONS OF WORK IN PROGRESS

Tania Saba, coresearcher at CRIMT, presented the results of an international study on telework in the context of the pandemic carried out as part of the BMO-Diversity and Governance Research Chair, with the financial support of OBVIA as part of the work on digital tools to combat the spread of COVID-19.

Alain Marchand presented the results of his research on the impact of telework on well-being at work (stress and mental health) based on surveys carried out before and during the pandemic.

PANEL DISCUSSION

These presentations were followed by a panel discussion with labour market partners who have experience with telework. Among other things, aspects to consider in planning for telework in a post-pandemic context were discussed, followed by an exchange with participants. This panel discussion consisted of:

Anne-Marie Hubert, Managing Partner for Quebec, Ernst & Young Canada, Francois Lamoureux, President, Comité consultatif du travail et de la main d’oeuvre, Ministère du Travail, de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité Social, Manon Poirier, Executive Director, Ordre des conseillers en ressources humaines agréés du Québec.


18 November 2020

Webinar

Democratizing Work: A Conversation on the Lessons of the Current Pandemic for the World of Work

“Working humans are so much more than ‘resources’”. This is one of the central lessons of the current crisis. So begins a manifesto drafted in the spring of 2020 in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, which argues that work needs to be democratized, de-commodified and made sustainable. The Manifesto has been translated in multiple languages and supported across the globe.

This conversation on Democratizing Work, which took place on November 18th, was an opportunity to bring together its authors with leading representatives and specialists from the world of work in a dialogue about the Manifesto and current priorities for the pandemic and beyond.

Authors of the Manifesto present: 

Julie Battilana (Harvard University)
Isabelle Ferreras 
(CriDIS-UCLouvain) 

Discussants: 

Lana Payne (UNIFOR)
Andrew Jackson (Broadbent Institute)
Esteban Kelly 
(U.S. Federation of Worker Cooperatives)
Jim Stanford 
(Centre for Future Work) 

Moderators:  

Margie Mendell (Université Concordia)
Gregor Murray (Université de Montréal) 

This Conversation on Democratizing Work was an initiative of the CRIMT Partnership on Institutional Experimentation for Better Work, the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy, and the Industry 4.0, Work and Employment of the International Observatory of the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technology.


17 November 2020

Webinar [held in French]

Démocratiser le travail: une conversation sur les leçons de la pandémie

“Working humans are so much more than ‘resources’”. This is one of the central lessons of the current crisis. So begins a manifesto drafted in the spring of 2020 in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, which argues that work needs to be democratized, de-commodified and made sustainable. The Manifesto has been translated in multiple languages and supported across the globe.

This conversation on Democratizing Work [held in French], which took place on November 17th, was an opportunity to bring together its authors with leading representatives and specialists from the world of work in a dialogue about the Manifesto and current priorities for the pandemic and beyond.

Authors of the Manifesto present: 

Adelle Blackett (LLDRL-Université McGill)
Isabelle Ferreras (CriDIS-UCLouvain)
Dominique Méda (IRISSO-Université Paris Dauphine) 

Discussants: 

Nil Ataogul (TUAC)
Pierre-Antoine Harvey (CSQ)
Josée Lamoureux (CSN)
Jonathan Vallée-Payette (FTQ) 

Moderators:  

Margie Mendell (Université Concordia)
Gregor Murray (Université de Montréal) 

This Conversation on Democratizing Work was an initiative of the CRIMT Partnership on Institutional Experimentation for Better Work, the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy, and the Industry 4.0, Work and Employment of the International Observatory of the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technology.


13 November 2020

Webinar

Combatting Modern Slavery. A conversation with Genevieve LeBaron, author of Combatting Modern Slavery: Why Labour Governance is Failing and What we Can do about it

Goal 8.7 of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals calls on governments, companies and civil society to “take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour and end modern slavery”. In her important new book Combatting Modern Slavery: Why Labour Governance is Failing and What Can we Do about it. (Polity 2020), Professor Genevieve LaBaron lifts the lid on a labour governance regime that is severely flawed and limited. She takes a close-up look at the millions of corporate dollars spent on anti-slavery networks, NGO partnerships, lobbying for new transparency legislation, and investment in social auditing and ethical certification schemes, to show how such efforts serve to bolster corporate growth and legitimacy as well as government reputations, whilst failing to protect the world’s most vulnerable workers.

In this online seminar, Judy Fudge (McMaster University) and Jonelle Humphrey (CRIMT PhD student and recipient of the Shirley Goldenberg-CRIMT Scholarship) conducted an in-depth conversation with the author about her book.


24-27 June 2020

ILERA 10th Regional Congress for the Americas

Virtual conference

Special Colloquium : CRIMT Partnership Project on Institutional Experimentation for Better (or Worse) Work

Organized jointly by the Canadian Industrial Relations Association (CIRA), Ryerson University Ted Rogers School of Management and ILERA, in association with numerous partners, including CRIMT, ILERA’s 10th Congress for the Americas aimed to provide a space for the study of work and employment from a global, multidisciplinary perspective, firmly rooted in the reality of workplaces and open to the diversity of ideas, interests and points of view as well as to critical thinking.

CRIMT held a special colloquium (6 workshops) mobilising the work of several coresearchers and student members of its Partnership Project on Institutional Experimentation for Better (or Worse) Work.

The recordings of these six workshops are available on CRIMT’s YouTube Channel, as well as on the CIRA Channel, co-organizer of the event.


1 May 2020

Online Program-International Conference

Virtual Forum

FirstMAI2020 : GET THE JOB DONE. Proposals for an Ecological, Social and Democratic Plan

In the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, total lockdowns led to work being both mishandled and recognized in new ways. On May 1, 2020, the CESEP, the TED-CriDIS-UCLouvain group and the Federation of Social Services – FDSS, in partnership with the Actrices & Acteurs des temps présents, Econosphères, FEC Formation Education Culture, CRIMT, Smart Belgique, Propage-s, CIEP/MOC Brabant wallon, the Federation of Medical Houses, Associations 21 and POUR organized a talk show to discuss bold proposals for a reorganization of the world of work, so that the post-Covid era does not signal a return to the status quo or, worse, a hardening of prior positions.

The program was hosted by Isabelle Masson-Loodts (independent journalist) and Julien Charles (UCLouvain and co-researcher at CRIMT).

View the recording of this outreach activity.

An initiative of


10 January – 11 April 2019

Open course

Transnational Futures of International Labour Law

This 12-week lecture series, beginning on January 10 and ending on April 11, convened leading stakeholders in Canada and abroad, from within the ILO and beyond, to lead high-level discussions and to formulate recommendations on the role of transnational labour law in a globally interconnected world. Every week, participants were invited to join Professor Adelle Blackett’s classroom to present their research findings and share their expertise on emerging areas and pressing topics in international labour law. This seminar offered a unique opportunity to commemorate the ILO’s work over the last 100 years and critically reflect on the transnational futures of international labour law.

The video recordings of all conferences are available here.

An initiative of


25-27 October 2018

Colloque international du CRIMT

HEC Montréal, Canada

Quel type de travail pour le futur ? Perturbations, expérimentations et re-régulation

This conference offered original contributions from academics and practitioners on two related themes: changes that disrupt the world of work and lead to the re-regulation of work and employment, and the forms of organisational and institutional experimentation that underpin or accompany these processes of change and re-regulation. Bringing together four panels of international specialists, more than 250 researchers from 21 countries in some 40 thematic workshops, followed by a one-day Community Forum, this conference brought together some of the world’s leading experts on work and employment.

To watch the scientific activities (panels and thematic workshops), please download the following file, then click on the author’s name or the title of the conference you wish to view. You will join CRIMT’s YouTube Channel, where the selected video will open.

Aimed primarily at social actors and mobilizing, within the same sessions, academics and practitioners from the world of work, the Community Forum aims to provoke (sometimes unlikely) encounters between the worlds of research and practice. The participants of the 2018 edition of the Forum discussed issues related to the future of work and addressed various themes, such as the renewal of union action repertoires, the digital transition, the challenges of equality, diversity and inclusion, transformations in the practice of collective bargaining, the prevention and post-vention of suffering at work, etc. The Forum also provided an opportunity for participants to discuss and exchange ideas and experiences on how to achieve better work, both within and outside traditional workplaces.

To view the Community Forum activities, please download the following file and then click on the name of the session you wish to view.


1 novembre 2017

National Forum

Montreal Science Centre, Canada

Aero in the Age of 4.0. Anticipated Impacts on Human Resources

Aerospace today is at the heart of the transition to Industry 4.0. In the era of “big data”, robotics and artificial intelligence, many people are questioning the transition process to 4.0 and the place of human resources within these transformations: what are the challenges posed by the transition to 4.0? What about the impact of 4.0 on human resources management? 

This Forum, intended for managers and employee representatives, was designed to enable them to better understand the issues associated with the transition to 4.0, to identify the impacts of this transition on human resources and to identify possible solutions to meet the challenges of 4.0.

Organized in collaboration with the Comité sectoriel de main-d’oeuvre en aérospatiale and HEC Montréal, with the participation of Aéro Montréal and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAMAW District 11), it stimulated both plenary exchanges with the speakers and small group discussions among the participants on topics that encouraged the sharing of experiences.

Video recordings of all conferences are available here [contributions mostly in French].

An initiative of

YouTube channels

CRIMT and its partner centres have YouTube Channels containing thousands of videos on work and employment. Several of these capsules deal with experimentations conducted by social actors in response to the challenges posed by the transformations currently affecting the world of work, such as the Covid-19 pandemic, the environmental crisis, the rise of the digital economy and of artificial intelligence, the fissuring and unbundling of the firm, the redefinition of the role of the State, the reconfiguration of global production networks and value chains, the transformation of values and the assertion of new identity claims. We invite you to take a look at them and then mobilize them in your courses, training sessions or strategic thinking.

CRIMT’s YouTube channel

CRIMT’s YouTube Channel features conferences delivered since 2017 as part of the activities organized by the center. These 250 or so video clips echo organizational and institutional research and experiments conducted in more than 25 countries, the majority of which are in the North American, European and Oceanic contexts.

Partner Centres’ YouTube channels

European Trade Union Institute

ILR School
Cornell University

Labour Law and Development Research Laboratory
McGill University

Centre for People, Organisation and Work
RMIT

Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing
Griffith University

School of Management and Labor Relations
Rutgers University

El Colegio de la Frontera Norte

Cardiff Business School
University of Cardiff

Work and Equalities Institute
Manchester University

International Observatory on the Societal Impacts of AI and Digital Technology

Ithaca Co-Lab
Transatlantic Social Dialogue Webinar Series

Featured

Thematic playlists

Every two months or so, CRIMT will propose new thematic playlists created from conferences captured in the context of the activities of the Centre, its partners or its coresearchers.

We propose a first on the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic on work and employment. We invite you to browse through them and mobilize them in courses or training sessions.

Work in the Time of Covid-19

The first playlist focuses on the Covid-19 pandemic, its disruptive effects on work and employment, and the organizational and institutional experiments it is generating.

Multimedia Archive

2007-2017

How many times have you missed a lecture in a concurrent session and wished you had a second chance to see it? Or simply to view the proceedings of a conference that you were unable to attend? This compendium seeks to fill this need by making available, free of charge, close to 1,500 presentations (from academics and labour market players) delivered at major international conferences held at CRIMT during the 2007-2017 period. These presentations reflect organizational and institutional research and experiments conducted in more than 50 countries, the majority of which in the North American, European and oceanic contexts.

Aimed at university researchers and professors, students, labor market actors, journalists and policy makers, these conferences cover a wide range of topics, including economic and community development policies, gender studies, corporate social performance, union renewal, domestic work, ethical and sustainable development, labor relations and human resource management in multinational companies, citizenship at work, migrant workers, health and safety, pensions, comparative institutional advantage, corporate social responsibility, international framework agreements, new trade agreements, vocational training, working time and work-life balance, social negotiation, multi-level governance, legal pluralism and the future of labor law, democracy at work, the meaning and quality of work, etc.